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Category Archives: Collaboration

I’ve created two (VERY) simple semantic visualizations based on a search for terms defined as positive or negative. I was originally planning on dynamically generating word lists using WordNet or some other dictionary api. However, good-old dictionary.com has a much wider and deeper word well (including returns from WordNet). I looked into programatically parsing the returned dictionary.com url (which I may eventually do), but for now have generated the word lists manually (I know, I know, this is admitting some defeat). The visualizations plot a linear and then radial gradient based on lines containing the pos or neg terms. I keep track of the number of pos/neg terms, should a line contain multiple terms (some do). Each line (or concentric ring) overlaps its neighbors and is translucent, allowing some optical color mixing. Arbitrarily– red is pos and blue is neg. The gray is neutral.

Links:

Linear Visualization

Radial Visualization

The next visualization (yes, yes it’s a day late) plots an array of protobits (pixels) based on all the characters in the poem (including spaces). The syntactic elements are the colored pixels in their actual location in the poem. The poem is read (so to speak) by an arthropod-esque bot that moves across the characters. The arthropod’s motion is affected by the respective syntactic elements it crosses. Any characters the arthropod head touches are displayed in the bottom right of the window. The syntactic elements are also displayed in the center and remain there until the next element is reached. The arthropod, built as a series of interconnected springs, is a metaphor for the stream of reading that is affected by syntax, as well as its own inertia.

Link to syntactic visualization

It’s time this blog is resuscitated.

Fortunately I have something to write about, as I am beginning a very interesting collaboration with Laura on the visualization of 18th century romantic poetry-a subject I am severely ignorant about. Here is a recent note I sent to Laura:

Sent Dec 12, 2007

… Some initial thoughts I want to share:

1. I’ve been thinking and working on parsing:
Thus far I’ve been able to input the poem and generate some relatively simple statistical data about overall syntax and word usage (i.e. number of occurrences of terms). I could (and will) parse deeper and collect phoneme groups, prefixes, suffixes, etc as well. In addition, I really want more semantic “meat”, so I’ve downloaded WordNet ( a “lexical database for the English Language” developed at Princeton). WordNet should (I’m hoping) allow me to query all terms against a simplified semantic interface. For example, I would like to be able to identify any term that relates to birth or death or love or hate, etc. This seems the only logical way to approach mapping semantics. Of course, once I collect buckets of terms based on these more general concepts, finer semantic filtering could occur recursively (man that sounds pretentious-put it on the poster “fer sure”!). For example, all the terms that semantically connect to birth, could be further separated–giving forth of an idea, creating a life-form, heritage, lineage, noun vs verb, etc., etc.

If time permits (hah!) it would be good to find some other dictionary api’s; for example aural data (relating to phonemes), etymology, etc.

Once all this mess of data is collected and statistics are generated, I’ll connect the data to a visualization tool. For now, I’m thinking about using my protobyte forms as sort of a conceptual armature (genus perhaps?). I would love to have the poem visualizations/protobytes motile in 3D (ultimately evolving)-–poetry creating virtual life!!!

thought folks might find this free webtool interesting. 

activeCollab is an easy to use, web based, open source collaboration and project management tool. Set up an environment where you, your team and your clients can collaborate on active projects using a set of simple, functional tools. 100% free!

yes i copied the above from the website.

look at

http://www.activecollab.com/

lisa

We celebrated the "birth" of CHAT at a party yesterday: it involved a cake, singing, sliding on water (not ice this time).  Officiating were Glenn, Bettina, Ira, and me.  Appropriate to the theme of "birth," I had invited only those CHAT members and affiliates with children young enough to be infatuated with a water slide.  Unfortunately, that meant that we were without poets and narrativists.  A video of the event marking CHAT's birth is coming.

All the skating and sliding suggests that there exists an as yet unarticulated "rule" for CHATting, that it must somehow involve speed, glide, fundamental elements, and happiness.  Intellectual propulsion will feel effortless but will in fact involve a very skillful manipulation of surface friction.  Have I just described a MMORPG, and could a CHAT tool, or in fact our blog, work as a MMORPG?

We discussed widening the scope of collaborators, trying to get natural scientists involved: any ideas about fostering collaborations of any sort, whether among HA or H,A, and NS?